EARTHblog

Food Retail Industry Flexes Its Muscle for Alaska’s Bristol Bay

March 12, 2012 • Bonnie Gestring

Salmon consumers everywhere will be happy today!  The Food Marketing Institute (FMI), which represents a whopping 26,000 retail food stores, and $680 billion in annual revenue, has spoken out on behalf of protecting Alaska's Bristol Bay fishery - the world's largest wild sockeye salmon fishery.

In a recent letter to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), FMI expressed its support for the study currently underway to determine the suitability of large-scale development in Bristol Bay, including the proposed Pebble Mine.

It makes sense.  The Bristol Bay salmon fishery is an important part of our nation's food supplies.

So hats off to FMI and its 1500 members for its support for sustainable fisheries.  The EPA study is expected in late April 2012. So, stay tuned.  This important scientific assessment will help determine future actions to protect Bristol Bay.  

And, go enjoy some Bristol Bay wild salmon.

Media Releases

Food Retail Industry Flexes Its Muscle for Alaska’s Bristol Bay, World’s Largest Wild Salmon Fishery

March 12, 2012 • Earthworks

FMI Sends Letter to EPA Supporting Review of Risks of Pebble Mine & Large-Scale Development

Washington D.C., March 12th - For the first time ever, the nation’s largest group of food retail companies has spoken out on behalf of protecting Alaska’s Bristol Bay fishery – the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon fishery. The Food Marketing Institute (FMI), which represents 26,000 retail food stores, and $680 billion in annual revenue -- three-quarters of US retail food store sales -- announced its support for the EPA study currently underway to determine the suitability of large-scale development in Bristol Bay, including the Pebble Mine.

EARTHblog

This Thanksgiving time, Indigeneous Peoples discussed rights, food, and water at Forum in Peru

February 10, 2011 • Scott Cardiff

As many around the US gather and consider the meaning of Thanksgiving and the plight of Native Americans today, Indigenous Peoples in much of the world continue to struggle with impacts of destructive mining projects -- including impacts on rights, water supply, and food security.

Just last week here in Lima, Peru, Indigenous Peoples gathered for the Indigenous Peoples Forum on Mining, Climate Change, and Well-being. Indigenous representatives from the Andes, the Amazon, and Central America discussed the impacts of mining and the climate crisis on their rights, culture, society, and the environment. Many reported on the harm mining has caused to their water quality and availability, and to their food sources.