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Yet another study confirms methane pollution

By Pete Dronkers

August 24, 2016

Last week, NASA released a follow-up study on its 2014 report that exposed a huge methane hotspot looming over the Four Corners. In the original report, NASA did not know what was causing this highly unusual density of methane pollution. The agency’s latest report drilled deeper to find the source of the pollution: the oil and gas industry.

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A year later the Animas River mine spill could happen again

By Jennifer Krill

August 10, 2016

Anyone who saw the river turn orange will remember it for the rest of their lives. One year ago over 3 million gallons of toxic waste from the inactive Gold King mine cascaded into Colorado’s Animas River.  

Arsenic. Lead. A variety of other cancer-causing pollutants. Together they made the Animas River one of the West’s most contaminated places, nominated for Superfund designation. And since we lack the necessary rules to hold mining companies accountable for the pollution they create, American taxpayers like you and me are the ones who will pay the tens of millions of dollars to clean it up.

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Park Service Okays Thumper Trucks in Florida Panther habitat

By Aaron Mintzes

August 9, 2016

Last week, we filed suit against the National Park Service for allowing oil and gas exploration activities in Florida’s Big Cypress National Preserve. Located adjacent to the Everglades, the Big Cypress National Preserve is a national treasure, home to an array of endangered species and a special place enjoyed by many for its recreational, educational, and aesthetic value.

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Two Years Later, a Look at Mount Polley

By Shreema Mehta

August 3, 2016

On August 4, 2014, a mine waste dam in British Columbia, Canada breached, releasing 24.4 million cubic meters of mine waste (or tailings) sludge into the Fraser River watershed, a group of lakes and rivers that bear salmon and sustain the livelihoods of local First Nation communities.

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The burning problem of hazardous waste

By Nadia Steinzor

July 28, 2016

Whatever the cause and however extensive, a fire’s sheer destructive power always captures attention. The recent explosion and fire at a New Mexico oil field quickly grabbed headlines with images of roiling flames, thick smoke, and stories of residents forced to evacuate. Concerns remain about air quality, the lack of any evacuation plan, and health as WPX Energy, owner of the site, let the fire burn itself out—releasing toxins into the air in the process.

It’s logical and not that unusual for a drilling site to catch fire; both oil and natural gas are highly combustible and flammable. Yet the photos from the New Mexico fire reveal that several tanks used to store waste were also burning intensely.

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