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EPA-phobia: Fear the Scientists Threatening to Protect Us from State Regulation

By Aaron Mintzes

April 5, 2012

Last week, Senator James Inhofe (R-OK) introduced S.2268 the Fracturing Regulations are Effective in State Hands Act (FRESH Act).  The bill would remove all authority from the federal government to regulate hydraulic fracturing.  Even on Federal lands.  Instead, states will enjoy the sole province of fracking regulation.  Honestly, we should have seen this coming.  For months now, many members of Congress have touted the benefits of local fracking regulation and complained about federal government overreach.  A number of states with prevalent hydraulic fracturing industries have regulated resource extraction for generations.  Texas, Wyoming, and Colorado, for example, contain resource rich lands and populations very familiar with oil and gas development.  Along with the extensive experience some regions have in this arena, many state and Congressional officials argue that differences in geology, geography, and hydrology suggest that the more local the regulator- the better.

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Ecuador signs contract for 1st ever large-scale mine; communities react with ongoing protests.

By Nick Magel

April 5, 2012

Last month Ecuador did something it had never done before. It signed contracts for the first large-scale mining project in the history of the country. Prior to President Rafael Correa's championing of mega-mines in Ecuador, Ecuador was the last Andean country without a large-scale mine. It was also the last Andean country to not have to deal with major water contamination from cyanide run-off. It was the last Andean country to not have to deal with the millions of tons of toxic mine tailings each mine site must dispose of, often in water sources. That's all changed now.

Despite growing protests because of Correa's decision to open up the country to multi-national mining corporations, the President has remained defiant and steadfast in his decision. Even as thousands of people poured into the streets last month for a two week march in defense of water and in opposition to large-scale mining, Correa proclaimed: "We will not be beggars sitting on a sack of gold.";

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News just out: Toxic spill at Anglo American Mine - another reason to oppose their Pebble Mine

By Bonnie Gestring

April 3, 2012

A new article in the Santiago Times describes a recent toxic spill at Anglo American's Los Bronces mine in Chile. According to the article, a truck transporting ammonium nitrate veered off the road near Santiago on March 28, spilling 20 tons of its toxic cargo just feet from a river feeding the Aguas Cordillera water treatment plant.

This incident was apparently one of many along the road, including a spill in 2011 of 790 gallons of ammonium nitrate spilling into and contaminating a nearby creek. 

The article quotes a nearby resident saying, "Since the arrival of Anglo American in 2000, it has become impossible to live here."

These spills highlight one of the significant risks of the proposed Pebble Mine, where Anglo American is proposing to build a massive copper and gold mine at the headwaters of the world's largest wild salmon fishery. To transport the ore, a 100 mile road must also be built, which will cross important salmon streams, and provide ample opportunity for spills like this one. 

For more on Anglo American's environmental and social track record, and a long list of spills, go to: http://ourbristolbay.com/pdf/anglo_trackrecord_final.pdf

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Senate Defeats Bill to Close Taxpayer Subsidies for Big Oil Companies

By Lauren Pagel

March 29, 2012

The Senate voted 51-47 today to defeat S. 2204, the Close Big Oil Loopholes Act sponsored by Senator Menendez of New Jersey.  The bill would have closed five major loopholes enjoyed by the five largest oil companies including BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, and Royal Dutch Shell.  All told, the bill would have saved taxpayers $24 billion over ten years divided roughly half between deficit reduction and clean energy programs.

 

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The Economic Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling, a Case of Irrational Exuberance

By Aaron Mintzes

March 19, 2012

The rosy picture from the natural gas industry: A nearly endless supply of energy, jobs, security, and economic growth. Diving in to the projections provided to us by drilling proponents requires a critical look at their underlying assumptions. Economists and other experts studying how much we have, how much its worth, how many jobs created, and how much economic growth generated use complicated algorithms to provide numbers for each of these values.


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