EARTHWORKS

Mineral Policy Center Becomes EARTHWORKS

March 1, 2004

Washington, DC -- Today Mineral Policy Center announced that it has changed its name to EARTHWORKS (www.earthworksaction.org). 
 
EARTHWORKS is designed to understand and offer solutions to the growing threats to the earth's natural resources, biodiversity, special places, and communities -- and to bring our messages to a broader public. 
 
"Our new name clarifies who we are and what we stand for--clean water, healthy communities, responsible mining, and corporate accountability," says Stephen D'Esposito, President and CEO of the newly named organization. "We're working for solutions that protect the environment and communities."

The structure of EARTHWORKS will foster new partnerships. Already, EARTHWORKS has formed a strategic partnership with a group of leading natural resource scientists and engineers at the Center for Science in Public Participation (http://www.csp2.org/).
 
This name change also reflects an expansion in organizational scope. Last month, Earthworks launched the "No Dirty Gold" campaign (http://www.nodirtygold.org/) with Oxfam America. The campaign seeks to educate and engage consumers, engage retailers, investors, and insurers. EARTHWORKS will also work to promote the recycling and re-use of metals.  

Mineral Policy Center will still exist as a unit for research and policy work - allowing EARTHWORKS to draw from the strength of Mineral Policy Center's expertise and dogged advocacy and build upon Mineral Policy Center's history and assets while adding new strengths and alliances. 
 
"With the Valentine's Day launch of our new "No Dirty Gold" campaign we have already begun the transition to our new name and the reaction we're getting is very, very positive," remarks D'Esposito. "People like the new name and they like that it conveys that we have an environmental agenda and are pragmatic and solutions-oriented."

EARTHWORKS will continue to focus on communities and to seek solutions that will have the most positive community and conservation impacts and those that set national and international precedents.


For more information:

Contact:
Stephen D'Esposito, EARTHWORKS, 202.887.1872x203

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