EARTHWORKS

Target says NO to dirty gold

Alan Septoff's avatar
By Alan Septoff

March 24, 2011

The third-largest retail chain in the US, Target, has signed on to the No Dirty Gold campaign s "Golden Rules" for more responsible metals mining.

In doing so, Target send a clear message to its consumers and suppliers that it wants nothing to do with dirty gold.

Target is proud to be part of the No Dirty Gold campaign, said Tim Mantel, president, Target Sourcing Services.

Target is one the top 10 retailers of jewelry in the country, and its support could provide a huge boost in the effort to clean up gold mining. More than 70 other jewelry retailers with combined US sales of more than $13.5 billion - nearly a quarter of the US market - have signed on to the campaign thus far.

The third-largest retail chain in the US, Target, has signed on to the No Dirty Gold campaign s "Golden Rules" for more responsible metals mining.

In doing so, Target send a clear message to its consumers and suppliers that it wants nothing to do with dirty gold.

Target is proud to be part of the No Dirty Gold campaign, said Tim Mantel, president, Target Sourcing Services.

Target is one the top 10 retailers of jewelry in the country, and its support could provide a huge boost in the effort to clean up gold mining. More than 70 other jewelry retailers with combined US sales of more than $13.5 billion - nearly a quarter of the US market - have signed on to the campaign thus far.

Consumers are asking questions about the source of their wedding rings and cell phones could these products have helped fuel armed conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, or polluted drinking water in Peru?

Companies that sell products containing gold are realizing that their customers are increasingly concerned about the devastating impact that mining can have on communities and the environment - and are demanding alternatives to dirty gold.

As a leading retailer of jewelry and electronics, Target s decision to shun irresponsibly mined gold brings us a step closer to making these alternatives a reality. There is already increasing movement towards improved tracing and certification mechanisms for mined products. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is developing final rules on tracking and disclosure of conflict gold content in electronics products and jewelry. Discussions are advancing on third party certification of more responsible mining practices through the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA). 

Gold mining produces mind-boggling quantities of waste and pollution. The production of one gold ring generates an average of 20 tons of mine waste. Gold mining has been linked to human rights violations, forest destruction, toxic pollution, and loss of lands and livelihoods.

Want to help clean it up? Take a minute to add your name to the No Dirty Gold pledge. And please join us on Facebook... and tell your friends to do so as well!

Tagged with: target, jewelry retailers, golden rules, dirty gold, conflict gold

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