EARTHWORKS

Over 80 jewelry companies now signatories of the Golden Rules

Nick Magel's avatar
By Nick Magel

August 9, 2011

Gold rings

Four new jewelry retailers have announced their decision to shun irresponsibly mined gold and seek cleaner sources of gold and precious metals.

Brilliance Jewelry, Since1910.com, Jon R. Fox Jewellers, and Do Amore Jewelery, joined the other 77 jewelry companies and retailers in signing the No Dirty Gold campaign's Golden Rules for responsible sourcing of precious metals.

The list of Golden Rules signatories now includes more than 80 jewelry retailers representing over $14 billion in annual US jewelry sales, or nearly a quarter of total sales.

"The world is a different place then it was when we were founded in 1910. It is the responsibility of all of us to see that it remains a clean and humane environment for future generations." -- Michael Gross, President of Since1910.com.

The No Dirty Gold campaign congratulates these companies for taking a stand against irresponsible mining practices. Consumer and jeweler opposition to dirty gold comes at a time when mining companies are continuing to push irresponsible mining projects that will impact communities all over the world. The jewelry industry's rejection of dirty gold thus puts the onus on the mining companies to provide what these companies, and their customers, are asking for.

Jewelers are increasingly realizing that their customers are concerned about dirty gold and the devastating effect of gold mining on communities and the environment. The production of one gold ring generates an average of 20 tons of mine waste. Gold mining has been linked to conflict and human rights violations, forest destruction, toxic pollution, and loss of lands and livelihoods.

Tagged with: jewelry retailers, jewelry, golden rules, dirty gold

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