EARTHWORKS

EARTHblog

No Dirty Gold activists hammer Costco s Facebook page

By Nick Magel

May 25, 2011

Costco

On May 16, Change.org, in support of EARTHWORKS No Dirty Gold Campaign, released a multipronged social media action against Costco. Change.org redeveloped an online petition calling for Costco to sign onto the Golden Rules principles that has since garnered over 27,000 signatures. Accompanying the morning s petition blitz was a creative bomb of Costco s Facebook page, where responsible gold mining activists changed their profile pictures in order to spell out No Dirty Gold on Costco s Facebook homepage.

 

Read more

Tagged with:


No Dirty Gold activists hammer Costco s Facebook page

By Nick Magel

May 25, 2011

On May 16, Change.org, in support of EARTHWORKS No Dirty Gold Campaign, released a multipronged social media action against Costco. Change.org redeveloped an online petition calling for Costco to sign onto the Golden Rules principles that has since garnered over 27,000 signatures. Accompanying the morning s petition blitz was a creative bomb of Costco s Facebook page, where responsible gold mining activists changed their profile pictures in order to spell out No Dirty Gold on Costco s Facebook homepage.

 

Costco often uses social media like Facebook and Twitter to communicate with its customers. This social medium is one of Costo s most public faces. Likewise, Costco customers actively use Costco s Facebook page to interact with the company they shop with. As Costco s customers visited the company s Facebook page that morning, many began to ask questions about all the No Dirty Gold messages that kept popping up. What s with all these gold posts? and why is Costco buying dirty gold? were some of the common questions that everyday shoppers began to ask the company. We hope Costco will answer their customers questions by signing on to the Golden Rules.

 

Read more

Tagged with:


Investors Take Action for Oil and Gas Accountability

By Jennifer Krill

May 23, 2011

The activists' rite of spring has arrived, this year with a new crop of shareholder resolutions looking to reform the oil and gas industry. In 2011 investor-owned oil and gas companies are considering a series of proposals calling for greater transparency and disclosure of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing.

Shareholders have filed resolutions to address fracking at 9 companies total: ExxonMobil, Chevron, Ultra Petroleum, El Paso, Cabot Oil & Gas, Southwestern Energy, Energen, Anadarko and Carrizo Oil & Gas. "Oil and gas firms are being too vague about how they will manage the environmental challenges resulting from fracking," said New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli in a January press release. DiNapoli's office filed a resolution with Cabot Oil & Gas asking for a specific plan to reduce or eliminate hazards from fracking. This week, shareholder advocacy group As You Sow will be moving resolutions at ExxonMobil, Chevron, and Ultra Petroleum.

Read more

Tagged with: fracking, drilling, natural gas, activism, investor


Natural Gas: a "bridge" to where?

By Bruce Baizel

May 23, 2011

Credit: xdmag
Credit: XDmag

Now, as the issues of shale gas and hydraulic fracturing have focused attention on this sector, significant questions have emerged about the practicality and desirability of using natural gas as a bridge fuel.

One of the most interesting of the recent analyses of these questions is a report by David Hughes.  He suggests that a convergence of interests between the natural gas industry looking to hype a new production prospect with investors, the energy policy establishment looking for a new energy source to support future economic growth and large environmental interests looking for a simple way to lower carbon emissions gave rise to the natural gas as bridge fuel mantra.

The most interesting part of his report is a close look at the production numbers for natural gas and an assessment of whether it is even possible for natural gas to serve as a bridge fuel.  His bottom line:  that the bridge fuel concept for natural gas represents wishful thinking and is not possible to achieve.

Read more

Tagged with: drilling, natural gas, bridge fuel


Where do you think the fracking sand comes from?

By Sharon Wilson

May 23, 2011

Just when you thought you had learned all the dirty secrets of the shale drilling debacle, here comes something new. It took a while, but you finally figured out that the landman s depiction of two tanks sitting in a green field with flowers all around was far from accurate. You learned about the multiple tanks, diesel fumes, noise, bright lights, constant truck traffic, noxious odors, massive pipelines, injection wells, landfarms, waste pits, frack pits, compressor stations, tank farms, water depletion, water contamination, spills, processing plants, nose bleeds, royalty checks that never came, rashes, illegal dumping and etc. But there s more and if you live in North Texas, you should pay close attention.

The sand used for hydraulic fracturing has to be mined and that can be quite a destructive process. Sometimes, as is the case in the Ozarks, it requires mountain top removal. Other times they have to dredge the rivers, or they just dig the sand.

Here are some of the environmental concerns from frack sand mining. Thanks to Friends of the Rivers.

Read more

Tagged with: mining, fracking, frac sand mining, frac sand


Page 93 of 134 pages ‹ First  < 91 92 93 94 95 >  Last ›

On Twitter

MT @lisalsong: In #Bakken, 1 enviro incident per 11 wells in 2006 became 1 per every 6 in 2013. bit.ly/1r1v8zZ #fracking @nytimes
@hrzichal @DeSmogBlog Report is here: bit.ly/1r1uuT3

On Facebook